11 March, 2019 Physician Benjamin Xiao

Fertility Planning with TCM

Infertility is a problem that may plague some couples wishing to conceive a child, and both sexes have equal chances of being infertile.

This is where Traditional Chinese Medicine and its healing methods can help increase the chance of conceiving a child. In most cases, both parties are recommended to receive treatment to improve their body constitution.


Various possible causes for not conceiving a child include:

Kidney Deficiencies (Hormonal Imbalances)

In TCM, the kidneys refer to the ‘congenital constitution’ inherited from parents since birth, which is vital for growth, energy production and reproduction. It is similar to what is known today as genetic and hormonal factors. Energy from the kidney peaks around the reproductive ages of 25-30, however, it gradually depletes as an individual grows older due to various environmental and lifestyle factors.


Emotional Stress

The function of the liver in TCM is to regulate emotions and ensure smooth flow of blood and energy in the body. When under a high level of stress, these functions are disrupted and blood circulation is affected.


Phlegm Stagnation

Frequent consumption of raw, cold and spicy food adversely affects the digestive system. This often results in the production of ‘phlegm’ and ‘dampness’ in the body. The accumulation of these secretions in the body negatively impacts fertility.


Blood Stasis

Irregular menstrual cycles and uterine cysts may be possible causes for infertility. This is often caused by blood stasis in the ovaries and womb.

 

 

General Tips

Reduce stress levels by using relaxation techniques such as yoga and meditation.

Maintain a healthy weight by exercising regularly and a balanced diet.

Increase intake of antioxidants (such as folate and zinc) and avoid food rich in trans-fat.

Have sex during the fertile window. The best chance of conception is 5 days before ovulation or during ovulation.

Acupressure points to massage:

Article by Physician Benjamin Xiao

Note: Information provided is not a substitute for a physician or any form of medical care. Individual symptoms differ due to different body constitutions and diagnosis. One should consult a licensed TCM practitioner for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

 

About the Author

Physician Benjamin Xiao Physician Benjamin Xiao graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science with Honours, NUS, & Bachelor of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. His background in biomedical research in National University Hospital has brought him the inspiration and knowledge that TCM can be used to complement and manage many medical conditions in areas such as internal medicine, pain-related issues, ageing and even cancer.

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